Powertrain Related Products Gasoline Engine Management System

The Gasoline Engine Management System electronically controls combustion parameters (amounts of air and fuel and ignition timing) to increase engine output and reduce emissions and fuel consumption. 

Components

Engine Electronic Control Unit

The Engine ECU controls the gasoline engine in response to speed changes by the driver while maintaining clean exhaust emissions from the engine. Based on information provided by sensors, the ECU issues commands to control engine functions such as fuel injection and ignition. It also diagnoses whether or not engine control devices are in good condition.

Air Flow Meter

In gasoline engines, air is drawn in to be mixed and burned with injected fuel to produce thrust. The Air Flow Meter is a sensor that measures how much air is supplied to the engine. Based on data from this sensor, the Engine ECU (computer) calculates the optimal amount of fuel to inject.

Electronic Throttle Body

In gasoline engines, air is drawn in to be mixed and burned with injected fuel to produce thrust. Given a command issued by the Engine ECU (computer) based on information on the degree of depression of the accelerator pedal by the driver and other data provided by various sensors, the Electronic Throttle Body controls the amount of air supplied to the engine. This function better controls the speed of the vehicle, reduces harmful components in exhaust gases, and ensures safer driving on slippery roads.

Accelerator Pedal Module

The Accelerator Pedal Module uses a sensor to detect the amount of accelerator pedal depression and sends it as a signal to the Engine ECU (computer).
The ECU which, based on the signal, reflects the driver's intention to accelerate the vehicle, and controls the injectors to adjust the engine power.
The module precisely controls the engine to reduce exhaust emissions without sacrificing the vehicle's driving performance.

Variable Intake Air Control Valve

Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor

In gasoline engines, air is drawn in to be mixed and burned with injected fuel to produce thrust. Based on the amount of supplied air measured by the Air Flow Meter, the Engine ECU (computer) calculates the optimal amount of fuel to inject. The Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor measures the pressure of the intake manifold (the passage of the intake air). This information allows the Engine ECU to control the amount of fuel injection more precisely.

Air Filter Element

Air Induction System

Integrated Air-Fuel Module

Variable Cam Timing

The Variable Cam Timing determines the optimal timing for the engine to draw air into the cylinders and eject exhaust gases from the cylinders. The optimal timing for the intake of air and the release of exhaust depends on the engine speed, the degree of depression of the accelerator pedal, and other factors. By using the Variable Cam Timing, the engine output and fuel efficiency are improved while harmful components in exhaust gases are reduced.

Oil Flow Control Valve

The Oil Flow Control Valve allows the Variable Cam Timing (VCT) to determine the optimal timing for the engine to draw air and eject exhaust gases. Conventional VCT systems are hydraulically driven. The Oil Flow Control Valve regulates the pressure and amount of engine oil that is delivered to the VCT to make the VCT work properly.

Fuel Injector

In gasoline engines, air is drawn in to be mixed and burned with injected fuel to produce thrust. The Fuel Injector atomizes and sprays fuel into the flow of the intake air. It injects the optimal amount of fuel calculated by the Engine ECU according to the amount of supplied air.

Fuel Pump

Fuel Pump Module

Fuel pumps draw gasoline from the fuel tank and pressurize and deliver it to the engine. The Fuel Pump Module consists of a fuel pump, a filter to remove fine particles from the gasoline stream, a Pressure Regulator to maintain the fuel pressure at the optimal level, and a sender gauge to measure the fuel level in the tank.

Fuel Filter

Fuel Tank Pressure Sensor

Pressure Regulator

Fuel Pulsation Damper

Evaporative Purge Valve

Gasoline vapor leaking from the Fuel Tank to the outside air contributes to air pollution. To prevent this, the Fuel Tank and its connected components are sealed.
After vapors are temporarily stored in a canister filled with activated charcoal, they are supplied to the engine as part of the fuel.
The amount of vapor delivered to the engine is controlled by the Evaporative Purge Valve.
The Purge Valve is a solenoid valve that consists of a solenoid device portion and an air passage portion. (The operation that allows the engine to suck gasoline vapors absorbed in an activated charcoal canister is called purging.)

Canister Close Valve

Evaporative Leak Check Module

Gasoline vapor leaking from the Fuel Tank to the outside air contributes to air pollution. To prevent this, the Fuel Tank and its connected components are sealed. The Evaporative Leak Check Module checks to see if there is a leak in these sections.
The Module uses a pump to create a vacuum in the Fuel Tank and uses a pressure sensor to measure the negative pressure. If the negative pressure does not reach the predetermined value, the module determines there is a leak and informs the driver of the fact. The Module performs a vapor leak diagnosis some hours after the engine is stopped.
It takes approximately five minutes to complete the check.

High Pressure Pump

In gasoline engines, air is drawn in to be mixed and burned with injected fuel to produce thrust. Direct gasoline-injection engines deliver fuel directly into the engine cylinders. The High Pressure Pump significantly increases the pressure of fuel injected. As it is sprayed into the compressed air in the cylinders in direct gasoline-injection engines, fuel must be highly pressurized before being injected.

High Pressure Injector

In gasoline engines, air is drawn in to be mixed and burned with injected fuel to produce thrust. Direct gasoline-injection engines deliver fuel directly into the engine cylinders. The High Pressure Injector sprays and atomizes fuel into the direct gasoline-injection engine. As it is sprayed into the compressed air in the cylinders, fuel is highly pressurized before being injected.

Fuel Pressure Sensor for Gasoline Direct Injection

A direct gasoline-injection engine has High Pressure Injectors that inject highly pressurized fuel into the engine cylinders. The Fuel Pressure Sensor measures the pressure of fuel increased by the High Pressure Pump. Based on data from this sensor, the Engine ECU issues commands to adjust the fuel pressure to the optimal level according to the engine speed and load.

Ignition Coil for Passenger Cars

The engine power comes from controlled explosions of gasoline mixtures (mixtures of gasoline and air) inside the gasoline engine. Spark plugs generate a high-voltage electric spark to ignite the gasoline mixture. The Ignition Coil produces a high-voltage electric pulse for the spark. Ignition coils are generally equipped on each spark plug. Because of its shape, the Ignition Coil is called a stick coil.

Iridium Spark Plug

The engine power comes from controlled explosions of gasoline mixtures (mixtures of gasoline and air) inside the gasoline engine. Spark plugs generate a high-voltage electric spark to ignite the gasoline mixture. Spark Plugs with electrodes made of iridium alloy, which has a high melting point to increase product life, are called Iridium Spark Plugs.

Cam Position Sensor (MRE Type)

A Cam Position Sensor is a sensor that detects the rational position of the engine camshaft.
In conjunction with signals from the crank position sensor, the cam position sensor detects the current cycle for each cylinder and controls the fuel injection and ignition timing.
In engines with a variable cam timing (VCT) control system, the camshaft sensor adjusts the timing of the VCT.
Based on changes in the resistance of a magnetoresistive element, semiconductor cam position sensors detect the rotational position of the camshaft and their built-in signal processing circuits send signals in digital form to the engine electronic control unit (ECU).

Crank Position Sensor (MPU Type)

The Crank Position Sensor detects the engine speed and the angular position of the crankshaft. The Engine ECU (computer) needs these pieces of information to calculate the optimal fuel injection quantity and timing as well as the optimal ignition timing.

Knock Sensor (Non Resonant Type)

Oxygen Sensor

The Oxygen Sensor monitors the amount of residual oxygen in the exhaust. Before being released into the atmosphere, exhaust gases pass through a catalyst where harmful components in the gases are purified. In order to increase the efficiency of the catalytic converter, the combustion of injected fuel and inhaled atmospheric oxygen must be precisely controlled at the right ratio. The Engine ECU (computer) uses information provided by the Oxygen Sensor to detect the difference between the actual air-fuel ratio and the ideal air-fuel ratio to adjust the amount of fuel injection.

Air-Fuel Ratio Sensor

The Air-Fuel Ratio Sensor monitors the oxygen content in the exhaust. Before being released into the atmosphere, exhaust gases pass through a catalyst where harmful components in the gases are purified. In order to increase the efficiency of the catalytic converter, the combustion of injected fuel and inhaled atmospheric oxygen must be precisely controlled at the right ratio. The Engine ECU (computer) uses information provided by the Air-Fuel Ratio Sensor and Oxygen Sensor to detect the difference between the actual air-fuel ratio and the ideal air-fuel ratio to adjust the amount of fuel injection. The use of these two sensors, compared with using an Oxygen Sensor alone, results in more precise, faster control of the air-fuel mixture.

Thin Wall Hexagonal Cell Substrate

The Thin Wall Hexagonal Cell Substrate, which has a cylindrical honeycomb structure to hold catalysts, converts harmful components contained in exhaust gases into non-toxic ones to discharge them into the atmosphere. Harmful components in the exhaust include carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, and nitrogen oxides. Catalysts convert these pollutants into carbon dioxide, water, and nitrogen.

Combination Valve